Musicologie Médiévale

Resources for medieval musicology and liturgy

Bonjour a tous.

Can anyone help me with the date and origin of this fragment please.  It looks to me to be from 

an 11/12 C gradual, with its Carolingian script and adiastematic neumes.  It’s the introit for the Easter Sunday mass.  Approximate size is 310 x 210 mm.

 It bears a strong resemblance to this one in the library of St. Gall, which is dated 980 - 1000.

 However the initial is more of a foliate design than the knotted St Gaul ‘R', and I know little of the chronology of illuminated initial design.

Any thoughts gratefully received.

Andrew Leckie

Views: 596

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Regardez aussi ces fragments de Strasbourg :

Bibliothèque nationale et universitaire de Strasbourg, Ms.3.819

Bluffante ressemblance.

Je suis le plus reconnaissant pour vos autres commentaires.  Ces fragments de Strasbourg sont très intéressantes.  Je ne pourrais pas trouver les dates spécifiques d'origine pour le f3 et le f4 ?

Oliver Gerlach a dit :

Regardez aussi ces fragments de Strasbourg :

Bibliothèque nationale et universitaire de Strasbourg, Ms.3.819

Bluffante?  Non,  simplement un enthousiaste demandant l'expertise.

Miguel Baptista a dit :

Bluffante ressemblance.

Franchement, avec les neumes in campo aperto la datation est toujours comme proposée ici, mais on oublie souvent que on avait continu avec la notation adiastématique jusqu'au XIII siècle (j'ai plus confiance avec ce tableau de Vienne et même le scriptoire de St Gall était extrément conservative pour des siècles). Mais en Allemagne centrale, la combinaison des neumes sangalliens avec un tetragramme est plus commune.

andrew leckie a dit :

Je suis le plus reconnaissant pour vos autres commentaires.  Ces fragments de Strasbourg sont très intéressantes.  Je ne pourrais pas trouver les dates spécifiques d'origine pour le f3 et le f4 ?

Oliver Gerlach a dit :

Regardez aussi ces fragments de Strasbourg :

Bibliothèque nationale et universitaire de Strasbourg, Ms.3.819

Je parlais de la ressemblance entre le manuscrit ici présent et celui de strasbourg en aucun cas je faisais un jugement donc si vous pouviez arreter d'être sur la défensive merci.

andrew leckie a dit :

Bluffante?  Non,  simplement un enthousiaste demandant l'expertise.

Miguel Baptista a dit :

Bluffante ressemblance.

Beaucoup de mercis de nouveau.

Oliver Gerlach a dit :

Franchement, avec les neumes in campo aperto la datation est toujours comme proposée ici, mais on oublie souvent que on avait continu avec la notation adiastématique jusqu'au XIII siècle (j'ai plus confiance avec ce tableau de Vienne et même le scriptoire de St Gall était extrément conservative pour des siècles). Mais en Allemagne centrale, la combinaison des neumes sangalliens avec un tetragramme est plus commune.

andrew leckie a dit :

Je suis le plus reconnaissant pour vos autres commentaires.  Ces fragments de Strasbourg sont très intéressantes.  Je ne pourrais pas trouver les dates spécifiques d'origine pour le f3 et le f4 ?

Oliver Gerlach a dit :

Regardez aussi ces fragments de Strasbourg :

Bibliothèque nationale et universitaire de Strasbourg, Ms.3.819

je retrouve votre photo ici :

Pre-Gutenberg manuscripts illuminated at Melbourne's Rare Book Fair Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/money/investing/pregutenberg-manuscripts-illu... Follow us: @smh on Twitter | sydneymorningherald on Facebook

Andrew Leckie is quoted:

The music notation is written in adiastematic neumes, a system which predates the staff lines devised by Guido of Arezzo in the early 11th century. This new technique took some time to catch on in Germanic regions.

Of course, some scribes in certain regions (especially Austria) did know about these innovations, but like the scribes of Saint Gall they did not regard them as a real progress, instead they continued their own concept of an uncorrupted tradition. There is always another truth beyond those music historians tend to believe. This makes understandable why the reform group around St Bernard of Clairvaux ordered books in Laon and St Gall Abbey, but the reformers were not satisfied with the tradition as it was represented by those scribes in archaic notation, instead they invented a set of Guidonian rules, how to change these melodies!

A very interesting and valued response. Many thanks.

Trouvé sur le site de Andrew Leckie :

http://litterascripta.com.au/index.php?main_page=product_info&c...

Acheté 4500 euros revendu 8800 euros.... No comment.... Après on s'étonne de la flambée des prix des manuscrits....

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Partnership

and your logo here...

We need other partners :

© 2017   Created by Dominique Gatté.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service