Musicologie Médiévale

Resources for medieval musicology and liturgy

THE AUTHENTIC RHYTHM OF GREGORIAN CHANT - BETWEEN MENSURALISM AND SEMIOLOGY

According to my research conducted in the Netherlands, the authentic rhythm of Gregorian chant in the 10th century includes both proportional elements and elements that are in agreement with semiology (see Van Kampen, 1994, 2005).

Starting with the expectation that the rhythm of Gregorian chant (and thus the duration of the individual notes) anyway adds to the expressivity of the sacred Latin texts, several word-related variables were studied for their relationship with several neume-related variables, exploring these relationships in a sample of introit chants using such statistical methods as correlational analysis and multiple regression analysis.

Besides the length of the syllables (measured in tenths of seconds), each text syllable was evaluated in terms of its position within the word to which it belongs, defining such variables as ‘the syllable has (1) or hasn’t (0) the main accent’, ‘the syllable is (1) or isn’t (0) at the end of a word’, etc., and in terms of the particular sounds produced (for instance, the syllable does (1) or does not (0) contain the vowel ‘i’). The various neume elements were evaluated by attaching different duration values to them, both in terms of semiological propositions (nuanced durations according to the manner of neume writing in Chris Hakkennes’ Graduale Lagal, 1984), and in terms of fixed duration values that were based on mensuralistic notions, however with ratios between short and long notes ranging from 1 : 1, via 1 : 1.2, 1 : 1.4, etc. to 1 : 3. To distinguish short and long notes, tables were consulted that were established by me in an unpublished comparative study regarding the neume notations according to St Gallen and Laon codices. With some exceptions, these tables confirm the short vs. long distinctions in Cardine’s 'Semiologie Gregorienne'.

The lengths of the neumes were given values by adding up the duration values for the separate neume elements, each time following a particular hypothesis concerning the rhythm of Gregoriant chant. Both the syllable lengths and the neume lengths were also expressed in relation to the total duration of the syllables, resp. neumes for a word (contextual variables). Correlating the various word and neume variables, substantial correlations were found for the word variables 'accented syllable' and 'contextual syllable duration'. Moreover, it could be established that the multiple correlation (R) between the two types of variables reaches its maximum (R is about 0.80 !) if the neumatic elements are evaluated according to the following ‘rules of duration’:

(a) neume elements that represent short notes in neumes consisting of at least two notes have duration values of 1 time;

(b) neume elements that represent long notes in neumes consisting of at least two notes have duration values of 2 times;

(c) neumes consisting of only one note are characterized by flexible duration values (with an average value of 2 times), which take over the duration values of the syllables to match.

It is interesting that the distinction between the first two rules and the latter rule can also be found in early treatises on music, introducing the terms metrum and rhythmus (see, e.g., Wagner, 1916; Jeannin, 1930). As it could also be demonstrated by me (in fact confirming data published by Reese, 1940) that melodic peaks often coincide with the word accent, the conclusion seems warranted that the Gregorian melodies enhance the expressiveness of the Latin words by mimicking to some extent both the accentuation of the sacred words (pitch differences between neumes) and the relative duration of the word syllables (by paying attention to well-defined length differences between the individual notes of a neume).

Dr. Dirk van Kampen

- Dirk van Kampen (1994). Het oorspronkelijke ritme van het Gregoriaans: Een ‘semiologisch-mensuralistische’ studie. Landsmeer, the Netherlands.

- Dirk van Kampen (2005). Uitgangspunten voor de ritmiek van Gregoriaans. Tijdschrift voor Gregoriaans, 30, 89-94.

 

 

Views: 3748

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion




Jacques VIRET a dit : Je ne vois pas en quoi les antiennes de l'office constitueraient un cas à part. Elles seraient donc différentes, quant à l'organisation rythmique, de celles de la messe, introïts et communions ? Cette distinction me paraît arbitraire, et justifiée ni par l'analyse musicale ni par des critères liturgiques.

 

mais l'analyse le montre en toute clartée, au point qu'on peut retrouver les neumes à partir de l'antienne (je l'ai fait en classe devant mes élèves et avec eux). Les syllabes des antiennes s'organisent par groupes de deux (parfois une syllabe étant prolongée sur deux temps), et cela est impossible à faire avec les antiennes de la messe.



What happened, that made that today, when we sing a gregorian piece, we respect the syllable alternance accented/unaccented, as they are in scholastical verses such as those in sequencies, but not the alternance between long and short, as the syllables are in classical latin poems such as Saint Venantii Fortunati hymns? For example, how should I read the current notation of "Pange lingua", in which neumes are often on short syllables and rarely on long ones?

Best regards,

Maylis Ribette

In fact, the neumes of St Gallen give a very particular rythm for this hymn. It can be summarized in the following way (I cite the strophes because the first part is sung slowly and in a more ornamented --still rythmic-- way) :

De pa / re - en / ti - is
proto / pla -a / sti - i
fraude / fa - a / cto - or
condo / lens.
quando / pomi / noxi / a - a / li - is
morsu in / mo - or tem / corru / it

ipse / lignum / tunc no / ta - a / ui - it
damna / li - i gni ut / solue / ret

The syllables are organised in binary way, but mortem and ligni_ut are in a ternary measure.
And the first part follows a pattern wich is different from the second part :

. . _ _ . . _ _
. . _ _ . . _

. . . . . . _ _
. . _ . . . _

etc...



Ricossa a dit :




Jacques VIRET a dit : Je ne vois pas en quoi les antiennes de l'office constitueraient un cas à part. Elles seraient donc différentes, quant à l'organisation rythmique, de celles de la messe, introïts et communions ? Cette distinction me paraît arbitraire, et justifiée ni par l'analyse musicale ni par des critères liturgiques.

 

mais l'analyse le montre en toute clartée, au point qu'on peut retrouver les neumes à partir de l'antienne (je l'ai fait en classe devant mes élèves et avec eux). Les syllabes des antiennes s'organisent par groupes de deux (parfois une syllabe étant prolongée sur deux temps), et cela est impossible à faire avec les antiennes de la messe.

Vous choisissez sans doute des antiennes de style simple, mais je ne vois pas en quoi les antiennes de Magnificat, plus ornées, se distinguent de celles de la messe. Pourquoi le degré d'ornementation modifierait-il la nature du rythme chanté, du moment que les paroles sont toujours en prose ? Un même texte peut être traité de manière plus ou moins ornée. Oui, les syllabes se groupent souvent par deux : deux syllabes dans un temps de la pulsation (comme je l'ai expliqué tout à l'heure).

Dear Jacques,

I presume that your message about the duration of the two notes belonging to the pes quadratus vs. the pes rotundus, and the clivis with episema vs. the clivis without episema is meant to inform us that long vs. short notes show proportional differences in the order of 2 : 1 and that this phenomenon is stressed both by Cardine and by medieval theorists like Guido of Arezzo and Aribo. Indeed, this is precisely what is always emphasized in musical treatises of the Middle Ages, but many ‘modern’ gregorianists seem to have ‘forgotten’ this simple fact. Sometimes, they assert, that such proportional differences only reflect the adherence to antique Greek music theory, but this simply can’t be the only source. As Rayburn (1986) has already indicated, this attitude ‘is incredible, for certainly the monks and writers of the ninth century knew more about the subject at hand than did those of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; they were monks who sang every day in choir the very music about which they wrote.’ And, of course, my own research corroborates strongly the 2 : 1 distinction for notes in neumes composed of more than one note, because the relationship between musical and textual elements then becomes maximized.

Dirk van Kampen

PS Did you receive my email address?



Dr. Dirk van Kampen a dit :

Cher Jacques,

Je présume que votre message au sujet de la durée des deux notes appartenant à la quadratus pes vs les rotundus pes , et les clivis avec épisème vs les clivis sans épisème est destinée à nous informer que les notes longues et courtes montrent des différences proportionnelles dans l'ordre de 2: 1 et que ce phénomène est souligné à la fois par Cardine et par les théoriciens médiévaux comme Guido d'Arezzo et Aribo. En effet, c'est précisément ce qui est toujours mis l'accent dans les traités musicaux du Moyen Age, mais de nombreux 'modernes' gregorianists semblent avoir «oublié» ce simple fait. Parfois, ils affirment que ces différences proportionnelles ne reflètent que l'adhésion à la théorie de la musique de la Grèce antique, mais cela ne peut pas être la seule source. Comme Rayburn (1986) a déjà indiqué, cette attitude 'est incroyable, car certainement les moines et les écrivains du neuvième siècle en savait plus sur le sujet à portée de main, que ceux des XIXe et XXe siècles, ils étaient des moines qui chantaient chaque jour dans le chœur de la musique très à propos desquels ils écrit. Et, bien sûr, mes propres recherches corrobore fortement le 2: 1 distinction pour les notes en neumes composés de plus d'une note, parce que la relation entre les éléments musicaux et textuels devient alors maximisé.

Dirk van Kampen

PS Avez-vous reçu mon adresse email?


Cher Ami,

Oui, j'ai reçu votre adresse e-mail et je vous répondrai personnellement, avec plaisir. Je suis tout à fait d'accord avec vous, sauf que D. Cardine ne voulait absolument pas admettre qu'il y a des rapports mesurés comme 2/1 entre les notes chantées ! J'ai lu ses écrits, l'ai connu, ai suivi un stage avec lui où il dirigeait les chants, discuté avec lui et écouté les CD de ses élèves (puisque lui-même n'en a enregistré aucun). Il disait qu'il y a une "valeur syllabique moyenne" et que les variétés neumatiques n'indiquent que de très petites différences entre les notes. En somme il restait fidèle à l'équalisme solesmien. La "valeur syllabique moyenne" est une autre appellation du "temps premier" emprunté par Dom Pothier à la métrique antique et sur lequel se fonde aussi la théorie de Dom Mocquereau.

Jacques,

You are absolutely right regarding Dom Cardine's position.

Dirk

Ricossa a dit :

In fact, the neumes of St Gallen give a very particular rythm for this hymn. It can be summarized in the following way (I cite the strophes because the first part is sung slowly and in a more ornamented --still rythmic-- way) :

De pa / re - en / ti - is
proto / pla -a / sti - i
fraude / fa - a / cto - or
condo / lens.
quando / pomi / noxi / a - a / li - is
morsu in / mo - or tem / corru / it

ipse / lignum / tunc no / ta - a / ui - it
damna / li - i gni ut / solue / ret

The syllables are organised in binary way, but mortem and ligni_ut are in a ternary measure.
And the first part follows a pattern wich is different from the second part :

. . _ _ . . _ _
. . _ _ . . _

. . . . . . _ _
. . _ . . . _

etc...

Indeed, that is what I read in the musical text. But the poem is in trochaic dimeters: _ . _ _ /_ . _ _ , the second trochaeus of each foot is changed to a spondaeus, and I see no irregularity. In "Vexilla Regis" the verses are iambic trimeters in which the first iambus is changed to a spondaeus, and it is difficult to see that the music matches to the verses, but it does not do the contrary of the verses, as it is in "Pange lingua". Urban VIII wrote another text for "Vexilla Regis" in the 17th century and he also respected that verses. So, what happened since Urban VIII?

Sorry, in "Vexilla Regis" the verses are iambic DImeters, of course.

Dans la compréhension des durées, on parle beaucoup des manuscrits sangalliens.

D'autres familles de manuscrits, comme celui du  Mont-Renaud, par exemple, sont-ils fidèles aux deux règles de durées?

La plupart des notations sont rythmiquement imprécises, voire neutres ou presque. Le Mont Renaud par exemple ne distingue pas entre uirgulae longues ou brèves, ni entre une clinis ou l'autre. En revanche, il connaît le pes lié et le pes désagrégé, ce dernier étant visiblement long. Sur cette base uniquement, le Mont Renaud semble présenter un rythme moins régulier que St Gall. Il faut donc supposer soit que le phénomène n'était pas universel, soit que la notation est imprécise et qu'un grand nombre de pedes normaux sont quand-même longs.

Je penche personnellement pour cette dernière hypothèse, entre autres parce que l'analyse des antiennes avec mélodie identique et texte différent montre que certains signes sont quand-même séparables en deux syllabes (= ils sont longs). Cette méthode, qui a permis d'affirmer catégoriquement que le pes rond de St Gall = 1 (syll.) et le pes carré = 2 (syll.), permet aussi de découvrir le rythme essentiellement binaire de la grande majorité des antiennes (simples, oui, M. Viret) aussi dans les répertoires ROM et MIL (en plus de BYZ, cf. Van Biezen).

Quant aux antiennes ad Magnificat que M. Viret m'accuse de ne pas prendre en compte, il est évident que je parlais par généralités et ne contemplais pas toutes les possibilités. Les antiennes des cantiques étaient exécutées plus lentement (le tempo s'applique au débit des syllabes du texte). La mesure binaire ne concerne que les antiennes "simples", les chants modérés à lents ayant une "battue" avec des mesures à une syllabe, voire moins, les faisant ranger dans la catégorie des prosaici cantus de Guy, alors que les antiennes simples appartiennent visiblement à la catégorie des metrici cantus, dont le texte en prose est traité comme s'il était en vers (cf. Nigra sum, exemple lumineux de ce que j'affirme).

L'usage de la terminologie de Guy est tout-à-fait pertinent, car il correspond à un fait réel constaté dans le répertoire, sans compter qu'il ne vient que quelques décennies après les plus anciens manuscrits neumatiques (comme celui de Hartker).


Dominique Crochu a dit :

Dans la compréhension des durées, on parle beaucoup des manuscrits sangalliens.

D'autres familles de manuscrits, comme celui du  Mont-Renaud, par exemple, sont-ils fidèles aux deux règles de durées?

M. Ricossa, je ne sais pas comment vous faites pour battre les antiennes de Magnificat à la syllabe, ou la demi-syllabe, en respectant la neumatique, par exemple en différenciant les clivis simple et épisémée quand elles sont l'une et l'autre sur une seule syllabe. Alors vous devez faire de même pour les antiennes de la messe, introïts et communions ? À mon avis il y a dans tous les cas deux syllabes par temps, ou trois, ou une, ou une demie (ou un tiers, un quart...), en fonction de la mélodie, de la neumatique, du rapport texte/mélodie.  Si la mélodie est très ornée, un mélisme (mélodie sur une syllabe) se développe sur un, deux, trois, quatre temps ou davantage.

La notion de "temps" rythmique (= "pied" antique), délimité par une pulsation, est mentionnée par l'auteur des Scolica enchiriadis (v. 900 : "plaudam pedes") et par Gui d'Arezzo (début XIe siècle, Micrologus, 15 : "quasi versus pedibus scandere videamur"). Dans les Scolica le maître "bat la mesure" d'une antienne très simple qu'il chante à l'élève (il frappe dans ses mains), pour lui expliquer le "chant en mesure" (numerose canere) dans sa généralité. La battue rythmique est aussi mentionnée dans la Commemoratio brevis (percussio avec la main ou le pied). À la fin du XIe siècle, Aribon déplore que cette façon de chanter en mesure est en train de se perdre.

Je me suis mal expliqué (mais je l'avais dit dans un post précédent). La syllabe simple constitue un temps de base (=1), mais une syllabe peut s'étendre sur plusieurs temps. Donc, Domine (virgula - clinis celeriter - uirga iacens) = 1+1+1 (ou 2 à la fin). Deus (clinis cum liniola + uirga iacens) = 2+1 (ou 2). Je ne vois pas où est le problème.

La citation de Scolica, si elle était plus complète confirmerait ce que je dis, car le maître fait chanter à l'élève la même antienne à une vitesse donnée, puis deux fois plus lentements, et l'élève ne lui demande pas comment il fait à la battre deux fois plus lentement, car il suffit de la battre deux fois plus lentement. CQFD.

ex :

E-go / sum ui / a -a 

Ve-ri / tas et / ui - i / ta

ou bien : E -e / go -o / su - um / ui - i / a -a / a - a

etc....

Voilà mon secret, voilà comment je fais :-)

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Partnership

and your logo here...

We need other partners !

Support MM and MMMO !

Soutenez MM et MMMO 

!

© 2020   Created by Dominique Gatté.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service