Musicologie Médiévale

Resources for medieval musicology and liturgy

Bonjour, quelqu'un peut-il me donner une explication au double soufflet de cet orgue ?

London, British Library, Add MS 38120, 103r

Views: 1130

Replies to This Discussion

Maybe I was not clear. As far as I understood Mark (about early tuning in Dufay's Ferrara period), it is not meantone tuning in the respect that there are clearly the proportions 9/8 x 10/9 = 5/4.

There is still a fourth-fifth chain or palindrome which is corrupted at a certain point that it produces almost pure thirds!

What we do discuss here (although the picture in question stems from the 14th century), in as far this concept allowed to combine fifth and third chains in the same tuning system.

I doubt that στέφανος can mean bridge, but something which is surrounding!

Nicolas Meeùs : Thank you for precising that point. Now that’s clear. Nevertheless, The point is that lowening thirds and sixth (or the contrary, make them higher than pythagorian) in pythagorian tuning, changing the air pressure (and so the pitch and the dynamic) is exactly what I do on the portativ organ, for artistic reasons, since almost 30 years now. And I beleive every skilled musician is doing so, simply because being satisfied in remaining in one tuning system, never moving the rules, is simply impossible for an artist. There is the theory, and there is the pratice. As usual. The musical works are plenty of examples of exceptions to a tuning system from the plain chant in Montpellier Ms to Codex Segovia. And more, when I played together with Martin Ehrardt three years ago, I noticed that he was not tuning his organetto with 11 pure fifth. The reason for that is that he prefers to reach the pure fifth while playing, by moving the bellows giving more air pressure. I was first surprised about that, but then, hearing him play, I was totaly convinced. In fact for any real musician, it is important to change the basic rules to make Art. Playing a big third higher than pythagorian is important because it gives more tension to the imperfection. The same with playing a big third as a pure interval, without tension. Some music of Ars antiqua and Ars nova sounds artisticly better then. And what is interresting for a musician is definitly not the theory and the rules, but the pratice and transgression of the rules. There are beautiful examples in Machault music of big thirds making more sence by playing them not pythagorian. The question on the organetto is that changing the air pressure changes the sound volume and the pitch. So it is possible to move the tuning, but it will be delicate to do it playing together with a fiddle for example. delicate but not impossible. And it will go easier by playing with a lute or a harp. And it will be totaly obvious by playing alone. Playing one note with less pressure is ok with another instrument, it will just be a lower and piano note, playing to notes together on the organetto, like a third or a sixth with another instrument will be problematic, since the the pitch will go lower on the organetto. But for that there are other solutions, moving the rings or the pipes. Ok rings are never seen on pictures, but moving the pipes (i.e. the labium) seems to be a good solution. And about tuning systems, one cannot realy go deep and far understanding the music only with theory. When we experimented on tuning with Qualia , playing the Segovia pieces, and we spent hours and hours and hours on that, we noticed that both pythagorian and meantone systems where needed for certain pieces, simply because classical Ars nova cadences work better with pythagorian thirds and sixth, and because successions of sixth or certain big thirds in a certain musical context work better with pure sixth and thirds. In the same piece, yes ! C’est la vie !

Nevertheless, I’m realy wondering how you can make statements about playing, tuning and changing the air pressure on the organetto without being able to play the instrument yourself?!!!… This is not serious Mister !

Michael Shileds : right, there is no evidence for tuning an organetto a positif or a big organ yet. In modern organetto playing we now use rings, but no picture has been found yet with this tuning system. The only text that one could consider is the Da Prato description of Landini moving the pipes. But that is only an interpretation and an hypothesis. Now there are at least two a nice XV. Cent. Pictures showing a man working on a pipe in a organbuilder atelier (one of those I used for my 1995 paper in the Acte du Colloques sur les Orgues gothiques at Fondation Royaumont, éditions Creaphis). Anyway, can we realy imagine organs that cannot be tuned ? And can we realy image musicians that do not change the tuning ? Is a scordatura reserved to XVIIth cent. music ? I realy don’t think so ! But all that is obviously speculation and hypothesis…

Votre serviteur

Christophe Deslignes


Nicolas Meeùs said:

It is one thing to tune an instrument in, say, Pythagorean tuning, meantone temperament, or just intonation, and quite another to pass from one of these systems to another merely by varying the wind pressure. I don't mean that the instrument cannot play "in tune", merely that I doubt that variations in wind pressure could finalize the tuning.

Neither meantone nor just intonation are documented before the end of the 15th century -- with Ramos de Pareja's description of pure thirds (1482) being an important step in this evolution. Before that, almost pure thirds were tuned by enharmony, as Pythagorean diminished fourths (say, D-Gb for D-F#). This tuning was first described in the 13th century by Ṣafī al-Dīn al-Urmawī, in an attempt to emulate the quarter tones of Arabic music; the small intervals obtained, however, where commas, not quarter tones. In Western music, it was described among others by Arnaut de Zwolle, who mentioned one such tuning by a certain Baudecetus, who I think may have been Baudenet of Reims, late 14th century.

Mark Lindley discussed the possible adjustments of this tuning to suit the needs of particular pieces of music, but there is no evidence that the instruments were retuned from piece to piece.

I have little doubt that Pythagorean intonation was not used as constantly as the theorical sources seem to indicate. Yet, there is no medieval evidence of this, about which one could only speculate.

Thank you very much for these observations Christophe, I will look up your iconographical references- can I ask if one can also alter the tuning of a pipe usefully simply by disturbing it on its base?  This is what St. Cecilia might be doing in a Wiki  picture I found online (source unclear) at

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maindroitestececile.jpg

À propos, je m'excuse d'avoir altéré la langue de la discussion- mon Francais est un peu enrouillé, c'est à cause de cela que je me sers de l'anglais. J'admets franchement, hélas, que je ne possède pas d'organetto, mes experiences sont basès sur mon clavecin et (passivement) sur l'harpe irlandais d'un collègue.

Michael

On "Stephanos": the exact phrase used in ERlangen 554 is "der steffan / oder staffil"

It is very interesting to introduce also experience in performance practice in this discussion.

As far as organ(etto) playing is concerned, I prefer to stay out of this and rather leave the discussion to Catalina and Christophe, but I can refer to my experience with a vocal ensemble, and I freely admit, it was very hard for us to get rid off certain habits to intone pure thirds, because they are so much easier to perceive than a dissonant sharp ditonus (even if you perform music, where a third should most definitely not be used with just intonation). We needed many years to learn it!

I can assure you that Mark thinks and reasons rather as a musician than as a theorist (although he regards himself as semi-professional, despite that he was a student of Nadia Boulanger—he always asked young musicians to try things out), and the fact that ficta (in a certain clavichord mensuration) is used with meantone intonation (approximately) clearly means that even transitional thirds in a cadence could be not intoned with that tension that classical musicians are so used to! I do not expect that any of us here would argue against your experiments, all these are legitimate options (whatever the theory says) as long as they are considered and you are ready to go against certain own habits, even if it takes you quite an amount of time to overcome them.

As an ethnomusicologist I also experienced it the other way round, that within my field they try something against their habits, but not very successfully. In Bačkovo I recorded two Orthodox singers who tried to sing a monodic tune in parallel thirds, but it did not sound right, because they were stuck so deeply to the intonation of monodic chant which is quite fascinating to hear. Italo-Albanians prefer rather a Pythagorean intonation, when they perform traditional Balkan multipart music, their thirds have immense tension which can even be increased by interferential diaphony (I use the term to translate from German "Schwebungsdiaphonie"), but they are used as well to ghymel in harmonic thirds or sixths without any tension!

Concerning performance practice it means that we are asked sometimes to pass between different worlds, and I dare to say I do not trust musicians who are too stubborn or too lazy that they are not even up to try it out!

I mean, certain theory also might encourage musicians to try something new. There is nothing wrong with it!

Je vais revenir au français, parce que je pense qu'il vaut mieux que chacun de nous écrive dans sa langue et fasse l'effort de lire les autres langues (ce qui est plus facile que les écrire).

D'abord, je voudrais souligner que je n'ai jamais dit que στέφανος pouvait signifier "chevalet", seulement que le mot latin stephanus, utilisé dans ce sens par Arnaut de Zwolle ou Conrad von Zabern, ou steffan/staffil du Ms d'Erlangen, pouvaient provenir de ce mot grec.

Sur le rapport entre théorie et pratique, je ne suis en effet ici qu'un historien (de la théorie). Je voudrais néanmoins souligner que la théorie constitue, pour les périodes qui nous intéresse, pratiquement la seule source plus ou moins fiable. Je pense qu'Oliver a raison de faire intervenir l'ethnomusicologie dans le débat, parce qu'elle nous apprend que nous ne pouvons juger aucune musique "autre" du haut de nos certitudes. Et cela est vrai aussi bien pour la musique médiévale.

Affirmer que les tierces chez Machaut sont plus «belles» ou font «plus de sens» dans telle ou telle intonation, rechercher dans la musique ancienne des «tensions» et des «détentes» (ces catégories ne sont-elles pas apparues au 19e siècle?), c'est projeter des idées (légitimes, sans doute, mais modernes) sur des périodes dont nous ne savons pas si elles y avaient cours.

Comment savoir s'il vaut mieux «nous débarrasser de nos habitudes», et dans quel sens le faire? Que savons-nous de la conception que les médiévaux pouvaient avoir de la consonance? Ne faut-il pas considérer significatif, par exemple, que si les musiciens médiévaux ont fini par utiliser les tierces et les sixtes comme des consonances, ils ne les ont par contre que rarement décrites comme consonances? (En fait, le mot consonantia désignait souvent pour eux n'importe quelle combinaison de notes simultanées, y compris celles que nous qualifierions de dissonances.)

Bref, si je crois aux mérites de la pratique moderne des musiques anciennes, je pense qu'on ne peut pour autant se dispenser de lire attentivement les textes anciens.

D’accord pour l’utilisation de la langue maternelle.

Parfaitement d’accord avec vous Nicolas Meeùs : la théorie et les textes anciens sont en effets primordiaux pour essayer de décryper les musiques médiévales notées et essayer de leur donner vie aujourd’hui. Mais le praticien se rend vite compte de la limite de la théorie lorsqu’il s’agit de reconstituer une pratique disparue. D’une part parce que la théorie, comme la notation musicale elle-même d’ailleurs (notation qui au passage, n’est d’ailleurs pas toujours théorisée) ne rend pas toujours entièrement compte de ce que fut la pratique musicale de cette époque reculée, et d’autre part parce que souvent la théorie synthétise une pratique à postériori et parfois même elle a tendance à « effacer » ou remplacer ou réduire une partie plus ou moins grande de la pratique. L’exemple le plus criant que j’ai pu rencontrer au cours de mes études à la SCB étant celui des répertoires régionaux d’avant la naissance de ce que l’on appelle le chant grégorien, avec, dans les exemples musicaux d’avant la réforme, une modalité bien plus complexe que celle théorisée à postériori. Il faut connaître les traités et textes théoriques ça c’est absolument certain, mais il sont très insuffisants pour essayer d’approcher et de comprendre le plus possible l’oeuvre d’art. Tout simplement parce que l’on ne crée pas artistiquement à base de théorie. La création artistique est plutôt une transgression de la règle que son utilisation. Et les textes théoriques sont parfaitement inutiles pour ressentir l’œuvre. Certains musiciens des XIXème et XXème siècles ont eu un fort ressenti en étant confrontés à des chansons de Troubadours ou à une Messe d’Ockeghem sans avoir le centième des connaissances théoriques que nous avons aujourd’hui sur ces musiques. Et pourtant ces œuvres les ont séduit et inspiré. Ils les ont joué artistiquement de façon parfaitement valable et convaincante. Pour certains (prenant l'authenticité comme un absolu) il y a un avant et un après : tout ce qui n’est pas historiquement informé est à jeter : c’est-à-dire aussi bien une vièle d’Auguste Tolbecque qu’une transcription de Jean Beck. Cela m’a toujours semblé douteux de jeter toute une partie de l’histoire du renouveau des musiques anciennes sous prétexte qu’elle n’est pas assez historiquement (et donc théoriquement) informée... Ceci dit, les textes sont la base, c’est vrai. Base sur laquelle s’ajoutent d’autres expériences. C’est exactement la même chose lorsqu’on veut reconstruire un instrument de musique à partir d’images. Les images sont incontournables, mais elles ne suffisent pas. Et ce sera pareil pour les danses : les images, les occurrences littéraires et les textes musicaux sont la base de la reconstitution, mais ils ne suffisent pas. Et il en va de même pour la musique instrumentale: les quelques Istampite et Estampies conservées ne suffisent pas. Alors oui, l’apport de l’ethno-musicologie et de l’anthropologie est précieux. Et heureux celles et ceux qui peuvent constituer des groupes de travail composés de théoriciens, historiens, praticiens, ethnologues, artistes...

Parfaitement d’accord avec Nicolas Meeùs également en ce qui concerne la subjectivité du ressenti par rapport à une tierce majeure pure chez Machaut ou dans Polorum Regina du Llibre Vermell pour donner un autre exemple frappant. Mais cette subjectivité, même si elle est aussi nourrie par une l’étude approfondie de la relation texte-musique, est assumée et revendiquée. C’est une subjectivité artistique, d’un artiste vivant aujourd’hui. C’est vrai que nous n’avons pas la même vision du monde que les carolingiens, nous n’avons pas du tout la même notion du temps, et certainement pas la même notion de l’espace non plus, nos « instruments » de mesure ne sont pas du tout les mêmes, l’air que nous respirons est différent, sans parler de notre nourriture. Nous n'avons pas eu la même éducation, notre rapport à l'amour est radicalement différent, de même notre conception de la procréation. Les textes que nous avons lus ne sont pas les mêmes, notre langue parlée s'est transformée. Les bruits qui nous entourent sont différents, le climat n'est pas le même, nos moyens de communication on changé. Nous sommes autres. Et donc toutes ces idées de consonances et dissonances sont parfaitement modernes, c’est clair. Et même si l’on peut essayer de faire siens des termes comme « perfection » et « imperfection » (Oh comme je suis tombé des nues lorsque j’ai entendu pour la première fois la « définition » de la beauté que faisais Nicole Oresme, « un agencement intelligent et harmonieux de perfections et d’imperfections » ! ) ce sera toujours sans pouvoir totalement se défaire d’un déterminisme d’être humain du XIXème siècle. Mais n’est-ce pas justement ce qui est intéressant ? Ah quoi bon vouloir retrouver le « Paradis perdu » ?… Ou de façon moins provocante : sans tomber dans la vulgarisation outrancière, la complaisance ou le détournement, n’est-il pas important de faire vivre ces musiques anciennes dans le temps présent, avec des idées modernes, pour un public d’aujourd’hui ? La plupart des arrangements d’ensemble médiévaux sont totalement modernes, même si historiquement informés. Car franchement comment fait-on pour savoir comment Landini, Machault et consort jouaient leurs œuvres ?… Et même si le choix de l’instrumentarium et de son utilisation est moins difficile à faire avec une chansons de Marcabru, comment fait-on pour savoir si l’accompagnement improvisé à la vièle proposé par Brice Duisit est complètement à côté de la plaque par rapport aux improvisations de tel ou tel jongleur anonyme ? Ou pas  Peut-être Brice Duisit, tout moderne soit-il, a-t-il tapé dans le Mil?...

Bref, pour retourner votre conclusion dans l’autre sens, Nicolas Meeùs, si je crois à la valeur des textes anciens, lus le plus attentivement possible et le plus objectivement possible), je pense qu’on ne peut pas se dispenser du mérite de la pratique!… qui fait oublier les textes (théoriques) anciens. En tous cas lorsque cette pratique est artistique ! Et c’est uniquement cette pratique là qui m’intéresse. Quant à se débarrasser de nos propres habitudes pour mieux rencontrer une altérité ? Pourquoi pas ? Je suis tout-à-fait pour pratiquer l’exostisme tel qu’il est décrit par Victor Segalen. On pourrait presque le qualifier d’exotérisme d’ailleurs. Cela n’a jamais fait de mal à notre intelligence humaine que d’essayer d’assimiler (jusqu’au point de rupture pour Segalen) une culture très éloignée de la sienne propre ! Au contraire. Et ce pas forcément pour devenir Aborigène, Pygmée ou Carolingien !

En tous cas merci pour cet échange passionnant !

Bien à vous 

Christophe Deslignes



Nicolas Meeùs said:

Je vais revenir au français, parce que je pense qu'il vaut mieux que chacun de nous écrive dans sa langue et fasse l'effort de lire les autres langues (ce qui est plus facile que les écrire).

D'abord, je voudrais souligner que je n'ai jamais dit que στέφανος pouvait signifier "chevalet", seulement que le mot latin stephanus, utilisé dans ce sens par Arnaut de Zwolle ou Conrad von Zabern, ou steffan/staffil du Ms d'Erlangen, pouvaient provenir de ce mot grec.

Sur le rapport entre théorie et pratique, je ne suis en effet ici qu'un historien (de la théorie). Je voudrais néanmoins souligner que la théorie constitue, pour les périodes qui nous intéresse, pratiquement la seule source plus ou moins fiable. Je pense qu'Oliver a raison de faire intervenir l'ethnomusicologie dans le débat, parce qu'elle nous apprend que nous ne pouvons juger aucune musique "autre" du haut de nos certitudes. Et cela est vrai aussi bien pour la musique médiévale.

Affirmer que les tierces chez Machaut sont plus «belles» ou font «plus de sens» dans telle ou telle intonation, rechercher dans la musique ancienne des «tensions» et des «détentes» (ces catégories ne sont-elles pas apparues au 19e siècle?), c'est projeter des idées (légitimes, sans doute, mais modernes) sur des périodes dont nous ne savons pas si elles y avaient cours.

Comment savoir s'il vaut mieux «nous débarrasser de nos habitudes», et dans quel sens le faire? Que savons-nous de la conception que les médiévaux pouvaient avoir de la consonance? Ne faut-il pas considérer significatif, par exemple, que si les musiciens médiévaux ont fini par utiliser les tierces et les sixtes comme des consonances, ils ne les ont par contre que rarement décrites comme consonances? (En fait, le mot consonantia désignait souvent pour eux n'importe quelle combinaison de notes simultanées, y compris celles que nous qualifierions de dissonances.)

Bref, si je crois aux mérites de la pratique moderne des musiques anciennes, je pense qu'on ne peut pour autant se dispenser de lire attentivement les textes anciens.

Très cher Michael Shields : j’aime beaucoup ce genre de sources ! Parce que la plupart des gens diront : « cette position de mains, c’est n’importe quoi ! Aucun clavièriste ne ferait autant d’effort inutiles pour jouer ! ». Et pourtant, ce genre d’image peut mettre le doute dans les esprits. Après tout c’est fort possible que cette Sainte-Cécile agisse sur le pied du tuyau, en le faisant bouger. Ce qui aura pour résultat d’altérer le son du tuyau, c’est clair. Mais elle peut tout aussi bien montrer un certain tuyau avec son doigt, ou tout autre chose qui ne vient pas à mon esprit d’homme moderne ! En tous cas, mon expérience est que pour abaisser la hauteur d’une note d’organetto, les trois actions les plus efficaces sont :

1. agir avec le doigt sur le côté de la fenêtre du tuyau

(cette action permettant également de faire un très beau flattement comme les flûtistes baroques français, mais oups, là c’est peut-être trop moderne comme moyen d’expression !...)

2. tourner le tuyau dans un sens ou dans l’autre afin qu’un partie de la fenêtre soit cachée par le tuyau d’à côté

3. baisser la bague d’accord (qui n’est pas historique, mais bon les deux autres actions ne sont à ma connaissance pas historiquement documentées non plus)

Pour en revenir à votre image, Michael, de toute façon, ce genre d’action, si jamais elle était utilisable, serait très très virtuose (déplacer et replacer un tuyau avec précision, pendant que l'on joue, pour avoir un résultat sonore convaincant, franchement il faut le faire !). Mais nous savons (par deux textes, l'un en latin et l'autre en italien) qu’au moins un organettiste était très virtuose, Francesco Landini, et qu’il était le plus habile de tous à « bouger » les tuyaux (c'est dans le texte de Giovanni da Prato).

Pour finir, il faut également préciser qu’un touché prolongé d’un tuyau avec la main a pour effet de faire monter son diapason. Et oui le métal est conducteur de la chaleur… Quant à savoir si c’est cela que nous voyons sur cette image ?!… le doigt qui touche le pied du tuyau pour le faire monter ?…

Bon, ceci dit, en zoomant on voit tout de même très bien que 8 des 13 tuyaux de façade sont en dehors des trous. Elle semble les remettre un à un dans chaque trou… mais comment en être sûr ? Et pourquoi fait-elle cela ?…

Mystère et boule de gomme !

Quant à la provenance de cette image, elle est assez claire : c’est une des Cécile du Walraff Richards Museum à Köln, je crois bien que c'est celle du Meister des Bartholomeus Altar... à vérifier.

Merci pour l’image en tous cas et la question très pertinente. Je ne l’avais jamais regardée d’aussi près cette Cécile. Il faut que je retrouve les références exactes.

Bien cordialement,

Christophe



Michael Shields said:

Thank you very much for these observations Christophe, I will look up your iconographical references- can I ask if one can also alter the tuning of a pipe usefully simply by disturbing it on its base?  This is what St. Cecilia might be doing in a Wiki  picture I found online (source unclear) at

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Maindroitestececile.jpg

À propos, je m'excuse d'avoir altéré la langue de la discussion- mon Francais est un peu enrouillé, c'est à cause de cela que je me sers de l'anglais. J'admets franchement, hélas, que je ne possède pas d'organetto, mes experiences sont basès sur mon clavecin et (passivement) sur l'harpe irlandais d'un collègue.

Michael

On "Stephanos": the exact phrase used in ERlangen 554 is "der steffan / oder staffil"

Thanks Dominique for suggesting me to comment on the image! This is my contribution to the discussion:

(For those who doesn't know me: I am currently researching on the early medieval and middle medieval organs. Obviously I am also interested in late medieval organs!)

I want to point out something about the source that Dominique Gatté posted which has not been commented or analyzed yet.

The image of the British Library 38120 calls for an interpretation of the full miniature.
The lady in Dominique's framed fragment holds 3 instruments, all of them connected to religious texts and medieval interpretation of those texts as we can see in iconography through the medieval ages: a shofar, an organ, and a psaltery.
Now let's enlarge the frame and put our attention to the full depiction.

The title of this fragment of the manuscript is:
c 1400 Les Trois Pèlerinages, three poems composed in 1330-1358 by Guillaume de Diguleville (or Degulleville, Deguileville), a monk of Chaalis in Valois. ff. 1r-110r: Pèlerinage de vie Humaine, prologue and four books containing the first recension of the text, an allegory of the pilgrimage of the soul in this world.

Now we see in front of the lady a cleric who is at the same time a pilgrim as his attributes show (walking stick). The poem title clarifies the sort of pilgrimage, as the content is a philosophical story where under the form of an allegory the path of the human life moves like in a pilgrimage passing through different steps and experiences.


At this point knowing the nature of the poem we are able to identify that the lady's instruments are the attributes that allow the viewer to identify a role or a personage. I let interpretations about who is this lady out of the matter. It is a personage that is related to biblical texts and that has its role inside a religious text. She reencounters the cleric -who represents the “human life”- at the same time also two more heaven's creatures (one of them an angel with a relic on her hand I presume).

Long story short, the presence of instruments are identifiers of the represented allegorical personage rather than the representation of a real scene of use of the instruments on the 14th. Yet, the drawings might resemble at contemporary instruments that the miniaturist might have seen wether in real or in other depictions.

Like we know from other fields of study, being aware of the context of each evidence -in this case, iconographical- it is essential and allows us to get other perspectives.

In my research on the medieval organ iconography and sources the most common type of portative organs shows one bellow. Nevertheless images like the following (not the only one, of course!) display a portative organ with two bellows:
Bible, MS M.969 fol. 128r The Morgan Library & Museum last quarter of the 13th c

This image stays on the margin of the folio. At the same folio there is a biblical image of David, Samuel and Christ at the initial. Again, a religious text, now a bible where an organ appears, a common christian instrument of the middle ages.

Cher Christophe,

Merci pour la liste des autres possibilités pratiques pour altérer l'intonation!, je trouve surtout les deux premiers intéressant.

1. "agir avec le doigt sur le côté de la fenêtre du tuyau"

"cette action permettant également de faire un très beau flattement"  - par exemple pour améliorer des tierces ou des quarts trop grandes sans changer ni le vent ni l'intonation de base.

2. "tourner le tuyau dans un sens ou dans l’autre afin qu’un partie de la fenêtre soit cachée par le tuyau d’à côté" - je trouve ca tres intéressant. Peut-estre que le tuyau restait en plus sur un trou oval, c'est a dire qu'il aurait était possible de varier le vent pour un seul tuyau, sans l'enlever de l'instrument.

Mais je ne saiis pas s'ils existent, des orgues historiques avec un ou plusieurs trous ovales dans la boite (wind chest).

Greetings

Michael

Merci beaucoup aux participants de cette discussion et en particulier à ceux qui ont répondu à ma question !

Mes excuses pour ces digressions autour des températures du XV siècle, mais en fait ces images touchent beaucoup des questions de l'exécution, même celles qui ne sont pas exactement rélévant à répondre ta question précise !

Bien sûr !

Oliver Gerlach said:

Mes excuses pour ces digressions autour des températures du XV siècle, mais en fait ces images touchent beaucoup des questions de l'exécution, même celles qui ne sont pas exactement rélévant à répondre ta question précise !

RSS

Partnership

and your logo here...

We need other partners !

Support MM and MMMO !

Soutenez MM et MMMO 

!

© 2020   Created by Dominique Gatté.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service