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When I was a student of D. Joao Enout (himself a disciple of D. Cardine in Rome), I remeber he mentioned some melodies conserved on the Aramaic-speaking villages of Syria which resembled gregorian melodies.  It was many years ago, but I am quite sure he mentioned Jeremiah Lamentations of the Triduum Sacrum as the most convincing example of paleochristian melody which would have survived in the Aramaic-speaking tradition of these people.

Does anyone could confirm if there are really these surviving melodies in Aramaic speaking villages today?

Is it really the Lamentatio gregorian melody which was identified as similar to the Aramaic living tradition?

Thank you for your help!

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This is interesting. A few years back we hosted a Syrian Oriental Orthodox parish (in New Zealand, refugees from Iraq) under our Anglican church and we had shared musical occasions. Aramaic is/was their liturgical language and their chant at that time was untouched by modern western traits - pure 4th century Mar Ephraim chant with microtones too. I was fascinated by their music, but our ways have parted, and while they gave me a short CD of their work I cannot find it. There were websites where it was held in MP3s.  I have a CD of the Christmas Liturgy from their Jerusalem church. Nothing of Eastertide.

 

Thank you, Gillian. Could you give more details on the websites that held the MP3s ?


 
There was a site that gave the exact hymnody for each week. these things were apparently fixed from above. I will go fishing.

I have found the website:

http://www.syriacmusic.com/

It is in "translated" English so it reads rather oddly. The Iraqi congregation in Auckland NZ I have yet to contact. I will try to do so via the Jacobite (Indian) congregation of Syrian Orthodox who seem to have a parish church of their own. The Iraqis are the ones who operate in Aramaic. The Indians use another/their own language. I will try to get contact with someone/musician in charge.

Thank you very much, Gillian.

My aim is to have an example of a melody preserved in Aramaic in these traditional communities in a reasonable degree similar to a gregorian melody.

My master D. Enout told me about that and I am quite sure it has something to do with the Lamentationes.

I will search the syriacmusic site. Thanks a lot!!

This clip might be of use.....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vEkTbC8mq1U

It looks and sounds to be of the Middle eastern tradition rather than the Indian...

Also Our Father in Aramaic...

Thank you for the links. I am watching all them.

And here is another much closer to the Syriac - several clips - you even hear the Aramaic "alleluias".....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnXcKYNOsAw&list=PLB05457EA82C4F35C

I now have a contact phone for someone of the Iraqi Syriac congregation.  Do you have email address I can use for him? Of course your questions may be answered now anyway.

Be careful to distinguish the so called "Jacobite" (West) syriacs from the "nestorians" (East).

They have different music, a very different pronunciation of the syriac tongue and two very distinct liturgies. Indians belong to the Western branch, Iraqi to the Eastern one.

In the west, the Maronites have a liturgy and music very similar to the one of the "Jacobites".

Then you had also the "melchite" syrians, using the standard byzantine rite and music translated in syriac. Today they use mostly Arabic (like the Maronites)

Thank you for these important informations.

Ricossa a dit :

Be careful to distinguish the so called "Jacobite" (West) syriacs from the "nestorians" (East).

They have different music, a very different pronunciation of the syriac tongue and two very distinct liturgies. Indians belong to the Western branch, Iraqi to the Eastern one.

In the west, the Maronites have a liturgy and music very similar to the one of the "Jacobites".

Then you had also the "melchite" syrians, using the standard byzantine rite and music translated in syriac. Today they use mostly Arabic (like the Maronites)

Yes, this is a world the "catholic" west is unfamiliar with.  The Indian / Jacobite Syrians seem today to be using a "modern" idiom, whereas the SyriACs, (once upon a time Assyrians) are Middle Eastern and of the Eastern Oriental Orthodoxy - and the oldest of all Christian communities, formed by St Mark and based originally at Damascus. You can hear in their chant the odd Aramaic word we are familiar with - Bethlehem... Alleluia... Abba...

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